People line up to get COVID-19 tested in Brisbane, after two teenage girls brought the virus back into Queensland. (AAP Image/Dan Peled)
People line up to get COVID-19 tested in Brisbane, after two teenage girls brought the virus back into Queensland. (AAP Image/Dan Peled)

Fury at travellers mounts as Warwick prepares for worst

COMPLACENCY could cost the community dearly as coronavirus cases rise across Queensland, according to Southern Downs Mayor Vic Pennisi.

The state recorded three new cases of COVID-19 after two infected teenagers flew from Melbourne to Brisbane via Sydney this week.

The young women allegedly lied to authorities, risking the health of fellow Queenslanders and sparking outrage in Warwick, which survived the first wave with just one recorded case.

Diana Lasu, 19 has been identified as the second girl at the centre of Queensland’s latest coronavirus scare. Ms Lasu travelled from Melbourne via Sydney, arriving in Brisbane on July 21.
Diana Lasu, 19 has been identified as the second girl at the centre of Queensland’s latest coronavirus scare. Ms Lasu travelled from Melbourne via Sydney, arriving in Brisbane on July 21.

Social media has been flooded with commentary on the matter, with users voicing their anger and dismay at reports Diana Lasu and Olivia Winnie Muranga were ‘deceptive and deceitful’ with police.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll condemned the women’s actions.

“I am very disappointed with them at this stage, they went to extraordinary lengths to be deceitful and deceptive and, quite frankly, criminal in their behaviour and it has put the community at risk,” she said.

Cr Pennisi said new cases served as a solemn reminder for residents to keep Covid safe.

“This is far from over,” he said.

“This is an invisible enemy we’re dealing with and we can’t afford to be complacent.

“If we’re sensible, we can manage it, but if people try to cheat the system they’ll put other people’s lives at risk.”

The Mayor said another outbreak would be devastating to Southern Downs businesses, who have only just begun to reopen and rehire after the first lockdown.

“We’ll see motels empty, cafes closed, people struggling to make repayments and struggling to pay wages,” he said.

“We need to understand the risk and be careful, listen to the medical advice and follow their instructions.

“Unless we all pull the rope the same way we’ll end up back in that (lockdown) situation and I don’t want to see that.

“No one wants to see that.”

Killarney Memorial Aged Care, known for its precautionary stance on coronavirus during the first wave, announced its facilities would be shut to visitors effective immediately.

BACK TO BEING CREATIVE: KMAC residents will once again be relegated to their home, but staff have plenty of ways to keep them entertained.
BACK TO BEING CREATIVE: KMAC residents will once again be relegated to their home, but staff have plenty of ways to keep them entertained.

Chairman Lyndall McCormack said families were being informed of the changes today, and staff were taking steps to make online communication more accessible for everyone.

“Covid has tragic consequences if it enters a nursing home,” Ms McCormack said.

“We must protect our elderly community.”

Daphne Cross from Oak Tree Retirement Village is already well-prepared, having begun sewing face masks for herself, her family and the village as soon as cases started to spread in Victoria.

“I figured there’ll be a shortage of them in shops for sure,” Mrs Cross said.

“I got in and made some so that even if we don’t need them at the moment we’ll have them ready to go, just in case.”

The Warwick Friendly Society on Palmerin St sold out of their basic face masks this week, but still has the medical grade n95 masks in stock.

Chief Health Officer Jeanette Young said the next seven days would be critical, as authorities monitor the spread throughout Brisbane and re-evaluate restrictions accordingly.