STANTHORPE'S budding filmmakers have been given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn the ropes from the comfort of their own classroom.

Year 7, 8 and 9 students at St Joseph's School were treated to a Hollywood master class from Academy-award winning cinematographer Greg Huglin, and wife Andrea, through the "Kindness Umbrella" project.

Students were given industry-grade equipment to act, film and edit a short-film, which is set to be featured in a permanent exhibit at the Story Bank in Maryborough.

Year 9 student Bronte Duff said the workshop was eye opening to the intricacies involved with filmmaking.

"It's been heaps of fun and a really good experience," Bronte said.

"I think it's something a lot of people thing about because it's starting to arise more with everyone seeing the actors.

"After today, it feels more possible after we've seen it happen."

Students were encouraged to come up with their own lines in the short film, which will be featured in a permanent exhibit in Maryborough.
Students were encouraged to come up with their own lines in the short film, which will be featured in a permanent exhibit in Maryborough.

The workshops have been completed at approximately 70 schools across Queensland, with a further 15 secondary schools set to benefit from the in-depth workshop in the coming months.

Mr Huglin, who has 50 years' experience in the film industry, said it was important to show students alternative aspects to the arts industry.

"It's important in secondary schools to show that there's different pathways to a successful life being a creative person, rather than just going to a nine to five job," Mr Huglin said.

"We want to show kids that are thinking about what they want to do that this is a viable alternative to a traditional job.

"We like going to remote places, because you never know where talent comes from," he said.